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Seahouses RNLI Lifeboat Station


News Release 041-042/2019

TWO PERSONS AND DOG REPORTED CUT OFF BY RISING TIDE AT BUDLE BAY, NORTH OF SEAHOUSES.

At 10:53am on Saturday 23rd November 2019, UK Coastguard requested the launch of Seahouses Inshore Lifeboat, to assist two walkers and a dog, reported by a member of the public, to be cut off by the rising tide at Budle Bay, north of Seahouses.

Sea conditions were rough with breaking surf and a wind speed of Force 6. Seahouses Lifeboat Operations Manager declined to launch the inshore lifeboat from Seahouses due to sea conditions being at the limits of a D Class lifeboat’s capability. Instead the Inshore Lifeboat was taken by road to Budle Bay and launched in more sheltered conditions there. A request was made for Rescue Helicopter support, which was already being instigated by UK Coastguard. However as the helicopter could take 40 minutes to arrive, the Lifeboat Operations Manager directed the launch of the All Weather Lifeboat as a back up, due to the sea conditions and concern for the safety and welfare of the Inshore Lifeboat crew.

The Inshore Lifeboat launched, and experienced some  rough seas near the entrance to Budle Bay. Further information was then received from Coastguard personnel who had also responded to the incident, that the persons had come ashore safely at Ross Links, on the north side of Budle Bay. All rescue resources were then stood down and returned to station.

Seahouses Lifeboat Operations Manager added, “ We have had a number of calls this year to Budle Bay for persons being cut off by the tide. We would urge people to take great care when walking across sandy bay areas like Budle Bay and Holy Island, to be aware of how quickly the tide comes in, encircling the unwary. While not wanting to discourage walkers from enjoying the coastline, they do need to be aware of the speed of the rising tide. On this occasion, it was later ascertained that the people involved were not in immediate danger. It was possibly more of a false alarm with good intent.